Speaking My Mind

Supporting The Right To Be White, Multiracial White or Multiracial & Against The Improper Public Posting Of Personal Genealogy Information & Family Trees By Others

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It's Only The Truth

Posted by loud&clear on February 10, 2011 at 6:02 PM


The Story of One Man's Fascinating Discovery

An Africian American Family History 1780-1995

 

Much to this authors surprise, as he started shaking the branches of his family tree, lo and behold, all sorts of different people started falling out, some with blurred racial lines and obscure origins. The enslaved African Americans were there, but they were not alone for Native Americans accompanied them. There were also persons such as his great grandfather who was born a slave in North Carolina around 1855, but when it came to discovering his great grandfather on the census, however, things were much different. Though he was born a slave, according to the federal census he was White. This is such a good book!!

 

~Cary Faison's Dedication~

In memory of my ancestors, those great ones who came before me

And,

To women everywhere who have suffered from abuse,

Whether sexual, physical or emotional.

Blog Begins*****Blog Begins*****Blog Begins

My focus in my first blog, [Michael Tabler & A Woman Of Color], was the controversial Tabler family history, and the ancestors and descendants who were/are not dark skinned people, or don't feel that the are Black or African American just because they are a different shade somewhere between Black & White.

 

I really didn't think of my editorial as an opinion, but more less a voice for so many Tablers who are living something that they don't understand or think is unfair. They are people who are divided on their own history. It is my opinion however that a one drop rule for anything is not a good thing, because it takes away from all that a person is or has the right to be. I most certainly agree that most of America is of mixed heritage, but they just haven't realized it yet...and not everyone looks obviously multicultural. The world would be a better place if everyone felt that race didn't matter, but unfortunately it still matters to a lot of people.

 

The Tablers have a fascinating story and the more I research the more I learn about the Natives and the Whites, all of whom are ignored...the story has gotten so twisted and turned over time that it is not in any way accurate. For me that is something to care about.

 

I found this book written by a Black man or I should say a multicultured man who looks Black since it is only a color. He speaks of some other interesting books that he used in his research as well. In his family tree he found Indians and he found what he refers to as "white slaves". He learned that White slavery had been a common, well documented but forgotten part of American history. The lighter slaves were usually favored as house servants, but did not necessarily have it made living in the house. Although their chores may have been lighter and they dressed finer, the whiter their skin was the more they were susceptible to the White men's advances. This is exactly what the Tabler's Hannah was, a house servant passed around in Tabler Wills. This Black author learned that his great grandfather was most likely White because of the amount of White genes he inherited down through the generations from White male ancestors. This Black author doesn't adhere to the one drop rule and considers his people who descend from Native American's, Black slaves, and White slave holders to be white slaves, therefore White people...and that is what any Tabler who descends from Hannah should be able to say. I'm a White Tabler, I'm a Native American Tabler, I'm a Black Tabler or I'm a multicultural Tabler. Instead everyone has to say they are Colored or Black, if not it causes a big stink with some.

 

I've learned from reading this book..another perception as to what another cause behind the Civil War and freeing slaves was, it makes sense!

 

Enjoy the reading. It teaches you a lot from a Black man's point of view.... he gets it!

 

Categories: Book Reviews

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